Parasite Film Review

Parasite Film Review

  Therefore, if you are reading this before seeing the movie, and you have managed to prevent the whirlwind of publicity it has attracted since winning the Palme d’Or past May, it can be easier to simply quit and head right to the cinema. Because, in the possibility of adding to the hype, Parasite is in fact the sort of remarkable experience which makes contemporary movie-going such a joy. I watched it for the fourth time and I am now desperate to look at the black-and-white version which Bong recently unveiled in the Rotterdam film festival.

Described by its creator as”a humor without clowns, a catastrophe with no villains”, Parasite is much more Shakespearean than Hitchockian — a story of two families from different ends of the philosophical spectrum, told using all the trademark genre-fluidity which has witnessed Bong’s back catalog slide effortlessly from murder puzzle, through creature film, to dystopian future-fantasy and outside. We meet the Kim family, led by dad Ki-taek (Song Kang-ho) and mom Chung-sook (Chang Hyae-jin), in their humble semi-basement residence, searching for stray wifi policy and leaving their windows open to gain from bug-killing road fumigation. They have nothing but yet another and also a shared awareness of hard-scrabble entrepreneurism. When child Ki-woo (Choi Woo-shik) is confronted with an unexpected chance to home-tutor a wealthy schoolgirl, he receives his talented celebrity sister, Ki-jung (Park So-dam), to forge a school certification, bluffing his way to the job and to the house of the Park family.   An architectural miracle perched high over the slums of Seoul, with viewpoints not to urinating drunks however of lavish yards and starlit heavens, this rich house is what that the Kims’ pokey house isn’t: tasteful, angular and weirdly isolated. It is a lifestyle that is based upon hired aid: Trainers, a chauffeur and, above all, a dedicated housekeeper Moon-gwang (Lee Jung-eun), that remained with the construction after its first architect owner moved outside. Spying an opening, Ki-woo (recently dubbed”Kevin”) realises his own family may easily fill such functions, and hatches a plan which can inveigle the Kims to the privileged lives and residence of the Parks.   The Kim family can dwell in sewage-flooded squalor, however they’re obviously every bit as smart , and also far more united compared to Parks, who turn up their noses in the odor of”people who ride the subway”. In the same way, while the smug Mr Park is routinely depicted ascending the staircase of his ultra-modern residence, along with the Kims are envisioned scampering down city measures to their underworld flat, it is clear who retains the dramatic high floor.   If it comes to deception, also, those on the top rungs of the social ladder are practised as those whom they seem down. In a universe of perpendicular non-integration, Parasite finds out gasp-inducing depths lurking underneath even the most seemingly placid surfaces. Nevertheless Bong is careful to maintain his opposing forces keenly balanced, so producing the cinematic equivalent of a Rorschach inkblot test where the audience is encouraged to choose themselves the exact significance of those strangely symmetrical apparitions.   Perfectly accompanying the film’s tonal changes is Jung Jae-il’s magnificently controlled music, which goes out of the sombre piano patterns of this curtain-raiser, through the miniature symphony of The Belt of Faith into the cracked craziness of cues where choric vocals do struggle with a musical saw. As the action could segue from slapstick to terror and back — sometimes within the area of one scene — therefore Jung plays things right even as insanity beckons, ensuring the inherent components of pathos are amplified instead of regretting by pastiche.   For me personally, Parasite is best portrayed as a depression ghost narrative, albeit one disguised beneath umpteen layers of beautifully designed (and exceptionally photographed) generic mutations. Thrillingly played with a perfect ensemble cast who hit each single note and harmonic Length of Bong and co-writer Han Jin-won’s multitonal script, so it is a tragicomic masterclass which can get under your skin and eat away in the soul.

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